Cultural Appropriateness of Health Services?

If you are interested in learning such things as:

  • The methods researchers used to engage people from a variety of ethnocultural communities in relation to their healthcare experiences,
  • Research findings: re: cultural-appropriateness of health services and resources,
  • Specific recommendations for a healthcare project in Alberta relating to its codesign and content as viewed through cultural appropriateness lens,


consider attending this free one-hour webinar.

Four Small Words = Big Impact

As you may recall, June 6th was “What Matters to You?” day. Although these four words are simple in and of themselves, when a member of our Pts4Chg community introduced them to her homecare team, something special came about. See the results here. Way to go, Emma!

Who are the Experts?

With so much emphasis in the healthcare field on experts and expertise, here’s a tweet and its responses that look at this question. The next time you were asked who the health expert is, what will your response be?

Elephant in the Room?

If you only have time to read only one article today and/or watch one video, you may wish to make it this one. Thanks, Peter, for bringing this topic to our attention. As you correctly noted, it is “profoundly eye-opening, unsettling, yet so important.” This “elephant” is definitely worth talking about.

Tweet Worth Sharing

Every so often, a tweet is encountered that is too good, and indeed too true, not to share. Given how quickly the number of retweets is increasing, other people feel the same way. With any luck, some of the people doing the retweeting are physicians.

A Hospital Halloween

A Canadian hospital is helping make the hospital experience less spooky for parents of sick or premature newborns.

Yesterday, I was talking to some friends whose son is in the Alberta Children’s Hospital. According to J.W., they had spent over $60.00 for a Halloween costume for their two-year-old son, M.W. Unfortunately, due to a medical issue that arose on October 29th, the costume had not been worn and remains in its original bag.

Hearing this, I was reminded of an initiative that had been started by two nurses on a neonatal unit. The end result saw babies wearing handmade felt Halloween costumes at a hospital in Edmonton. Click here to read the story.

What? Listen to Patients?

The importance of the patient is becoming more recognized in the healthcare sector. However, in many instances, including the pharmaceutical area, the patient is seen as simply something to talk to or to talk about.

According to a recent blog post by Mike Rea, this stance is limited and limiting in terms of who patients are and what they have to offer. As he asks in his post.

But, instead of talking to patients, what if we started listening? Not just to what they ‘need’, but what else they want? There are so many incredible groups out there now – potent patient groups (MMRF, MDA, Savvy Patients and more), who want to talk to us, who want to share. But, start to listen, and there will be a hundred hands that go up to stop you doing that.

Click here to read the full article.

Developing an Osteoarthritis Tool for Patients – Get Involved


The College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Centre for Effective Practice, in partnership with the Arthritis Alliance of Canada (AAC), developed the Osteoarthritis (OA) Tool A that helps family physicians work with patients who have suspected, new or established osteoarthritis of the hands, knees and/or hips. Related to this family physician tool, a new working group of the AAC is developing a patient version. To find out more about this patient tool and how you can get involved in its development, click here.