Paramedic and Seniors on the Move

When an on-duty paramedic walks into a building, it is typically to provide medical care and services to someone. However, when the paramedic is Adam Loria and the facility is the Whitehorn Village, something else may be occurring.

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What’s Important to Seniors’ Health in Alberta?

Do you live or work in the province of Alberta and are you:

  • an older adult (65 years of age and over),
  • a caregiver of an older adult (spouse; family member; friend; neighbour), or
  • a clinician or health/social care provider (doctor; nurse; care aides; allied health provider; pharmacist; social worker) working with older adults?

If so, the Scientific Office of Alberta’s Seniors Health Strategic Clinical Network invites you to complete the following survey. By responding to the survey, you will be helping to determine the direction/priorities for future research and initiatives in the area of seniors’ health.

Hidden camera finds nursing home staff took hours to give man CPR | Toronto Star

There are some events that leave a person speechless. This is one of them.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/11/19/hidden-camera-finds-nursing-home-staff-took-hours-to-give-man-cpr.html

Connecting Through Conversation

For many individuals, their goal is quality of life rather than medically extended longevity.  This is especially true for frail seniors.  Unfortunately, there can be a disconnect between what the senior desires, the actions taken and ultimately the healthcare provided.  As a means of addressing this disconnect, a new study is being conducted in Canada that aims to evaluate ways to improve care planning conversations.  As Dr. John You, project lead for the project states, “Advance care planning can have a significant impact on the patient experience and the family experience….They deserve to have their voices heard.”​  Click here to read more about this study.

The Cost of Speaking Up?


Oft times, patients and families are hesitant to express their complaints and concerns relating to a particular care facility. The source of this hesitation can be from a deep sense of fear – the fear of retaliation. While in most cases no negative repercussions result when a complaint or concern is raised, such is not the case in a long-term care facility in Ontario, Canada.

According to a retired hospital nurse and daughter of a resident at the care facility, she is no longer able to stay in her mother’s room while her mother is being cared for by the staff. The reason for this restriction is because of the complaints the daughter made about the substandard care and dangerous hygiene practices she witnessed. “You complain and this is the price you pay.” What does this say about the facility’s view of family presence?

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The Magic of Music?

Have you ever noticed how your mood can change when you put in your earbuds or turn on your stereo? Have you ever been at a concert and, with the first down beat, felt more energized than you had only moments before? Have you ever been in a room full of people and witnessed how the heaviness and tension that was once present seemingly disappeared when music began filling the air? If situations such as these have left you wondering if there was something magical about music, you may wish to take a few minutes to watch this video.

Restraints as a Last Resort

“There’s a new provincial policy soon to be released in Alberta, ‘Restraint as a Last Resort,’ that will limit use of restraints to the least restrictive, as a last resort. There is a belief that lap belts in chairs keeps people safe (they fasten from behind), but the experience of being restrained is distressing – and can actually lead to more injurious falls and increased antipsychotic use. In addition, the restrained person can’t get to the bathroom, and may experience skin breakdown, loss of muscle strength, loss of independence and delirium (an acute brain injury).” Verdeen Bueckert, Practice Lead with the Seniors Health Clinical Network

Click here to read how an orthopedic team in Alberta reduced the use of restraints by 84%!

News Flash – AUA Expansion

A new provincial policy is seeing the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics (AUA) initiative expanding in Alberta. In particular, the policy addresses the use of restraints in all Alberta Health Services’ facilities and partners. The four types of restraints included in the policy are pharmacologic, mechanical, physical and environmental Click here to read more about “Restraints as a Last Resort” and other important topics in the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics (AUA) Winter 2016 Bulletin.

“Reducing Emergency Transfers of Nursing Home Residents (EXACT)”

If you have not already watched this video, you may wish to take a few minutes to do so. Among other things, it will provide you with some insight into what can happen when nursing home residents are transferred to the emergency department and how these transfers and negative effects can be decreased.