Just Learn to Live With COVID?

As greater emphasis is being placed on “getting on with life” or at the very least “learning to live with COVID-19” people who are immunocompromised, disabled or have medical issues that put them or those they care for at risk are being isolated, alienated, ostracized and ignored by much of society. In an article entitled, “Those who are Disabled and Immunocompromised need to be supported, not ignored,” Eva Williams describes this new reality. According to her, “The way that vulnerable people are currently being treated is nothing short of barbaric.” Click here to read Williams’ article.

Feeling Left Behind?

Every so often there is a Twitter thread that is a definite must read. This thread by Katie Babcock is one of them. In addition to the thread, you might want to read the comments by fellow Twitter users as well.

Burned out, demoralized and calling for change

“Primary care is the bedrock foundation for our healthcare system and the collapse of this will have after shocks felt at all levels of health care delivery. Having a family physician means promoting preventative medicine, doing outpatient work ups re directing care away from overwhelmed ER departments when appropriate, providing earlier more manageable disease diagnosis, collaborating with specialist and ensuring you get the best care possible. We are instrumental in decreasing the number of in patients and over capacity at the hospital. We help transition patients to short stay units, long term care or follow up on our discharged patients, and some of us even do house calls for the infirm. Good care means taking initiative and ensuring our patients don’t fall through the ever enlarging cracks in the system.”

Click here to read the full article.

Why are healthcare workers burning out?

iStock-Juanmonino

Given that healthcare workers have been dealing with the pandemic for over two years, it is fully understandable that many of them are burnt or burning out. Howevever, as the following statement suggests, the underlying reason for healthcare worker burnout may have existed well before the pandemic began.

“Our system was not okay before COVID-19. It was functioning because of the people in it, and because they give 110 percent every time they come into work….The cracks that were there widened and it became apparent to everybody.”

Click here to read the full article.

An Absolute Must Read

If you have not had the opportunity to read this Twitter thread, you might want to do so. It is definitely worth the time.

The Cold Hard Facts

Rallies in Alberta?