Join the Roster

Are you a socially conscious person with an interest in helping Alberta’s regulated health professions govern their members in a manner that protects and serves the public interest? Are you looking for a new and exciting opportunity to support the complaint and disciplinary responsibilities of the various college councils and associations that govern Alberta’s regulated health professions?

If so, Alberta Health is looking for you to become a member of the Roster of Public Members. Click here for more information. Deadline to apply for this opportunity is August 31, 2017.

Over-the-counter meds are no problem, right?

Do you know the side effects of acetaminophen – Tylenol? What about the side effects of Aspirin?

Many of us take over-the-counter medication on a regular basis. Due in part to the fact that these medications are available without prescription and are taken so freely and frequently, it is not uncommon for their side effects to be ignored and/or indeed unknown to us. Unfortunately, this lack of knowledge can have serious consequences. For example, in a 2006 FDA report, approximately 46,000 emergency room visits/year were related to acetaminophen overdoses.

In a recent online article found on huffingtonpost.ca, some popular medications and their side effects are identified. If you have not already read it, you may wish to do so. As Stephanie Hallett, the article’s author states, “Potentially serious side effects for popular medications are more common than you may think.”

What is Sepsis?

If you have no idea what sepsis is, you are not alone. However, with doctors being encouraged to pay more attention to the possibility of this life-threatening condition occurring, you are apt to hear more about it. In fact, in a recent “The Current” on CBCListen, host Anna Maria Tremonti discussed sepsis in a segment entitled “Why time is of the essence in treating sepsis — a growing killer in Canada.” 

If you have not listened to the program, you may wish to do so. Thanks to Nadine, a member of our Pts4Chg community, for bringing this program to our attention.

Voluntary Recall


Do you use Buckley’s syrup products for colds and coughs? If so, Health Canada is advising all Canadians that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Consumer Healthcare Inc. has initiated a voluntary recall of certain Buckley’s products. According to the advisory, the plastic seal on the top of the bottle can come detached and fall into the bottle. (See pictures below.) This, in turn, can present a chocking hazard if swallowed. To read the complete recall, including a list of affected products, click here.

Let Your Voice Be Heard


On Tuesday, February 28th, Red Deer doctors held a public meeting to discuss the deficiencies at the Red Deer Regional Hospital.and the impact they were having on patients and the care they received. In 2014, there was a plan to address these issues, which included redeveloping the hospital. However, in late 2016, Alberta Health Services removed this redevelopment plan from its list of priorities. This they did even though the Red Deer Regional Hospital is the fourth busiest in the province, is in need of “96 more admitting beds, 8 more emergency room beds and three more operating rooms.” In a notice issued by the doctors, “‘If you find the treatment of central Albertans by policy-makers and government unacceptable and unfair, let your voice be heard.'” Click here to read more.

Restraints as a Last Resort

“There’s a new provincial policy soon to be released in Alberta, ‘Restraint as a Last Resort,’ that will limit use of restraints to the least restrictive, as a last resort. There is a belief that lap belts in chairs keeps people safe (they fasten from behind), but the experience of being restrained is distressing – and can actually lead to more injurious falls and increased antipsychotic use. In addition, the restrained person can’t get to the bathroom, and may experience skin breakdown, loss of muscle strength, loss of independence and delirium (an acute brain injury).” Verdeen Bueckert, Practice Lead with the Seniors Health Clinical Network

Click here to read how an orthopedic team in Alberta reduced the use of restraints by 84%!

What is QI?

The use of acronyms and abbreviations is common in many areas, including healthcare. One acronym often found in written material and heard in conversations is QI. However, what does QI mean? Health Quality Ontario created the following video that highlights the key points of the QI – Quality Improvement – as it relates to healthcare. More specifically, what does QI mean in healthcare and why should we care about it? If you have not seen the video, you may wish to do so.

Get Involved!

Are you interested in promoting and improving the safety and quality of Alberta’s healthcare system? Do you want to see changes in this area? If so, the Health Quality Council of Alberta is looking for volunteers to join its Patient/Family Advisory Panel. Click here for more information.

Ask a Question

Did you know that more than 100,000 Canadians are unintentionally harmed during hospital stays in 2014-2015? Unfortunately, some of these incidents result in permanent damage or even death. To help increase patient safety, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute has initiated a campaign called the “Questions Save Lives Campaign.” What question would you ask your doctor to make your health care safer?
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Click here to find out more about the campaign and how you can get involved.