Hidden camera finds nursing home staff took hours to give man CPR | Toronto Star

There are some events that leave a person speechless. This is one of them.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/11/19/hidden-camera-finds-nursing-home-staff-took-hours-to-give-man-cpr.html

Let Your Voice Be Heard


On Tuesday, February 28th, Red Deer doctors held a public meeting to discuss the deficiencies at the Red Deer Regional Hospital.and the impact they were having on patients and the care they received. In 2014, there was a plan to address these issues, which included redeveloping the hospital. However, in late 2016, Alberta Health Services removed this redevelopment plan from its list of priorities. This they did even though the Red Deer Regional Hospital is the fourth busiest in the province, is in need of “96 more admitting beds, 8 more emergency room beds and three more operating rooms.” In a notice issued by the doctors, “‘If you find the treatment of central Albertans by policy-makers and government unacceptable and unfair, let your voice be heard.'” Click here to read more.

News Flash – AUA Expansion

A new provincial policy is seeing the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics (AUA) initiative expanding in Alberta. In particular, the policy addresses the use of restraints in all Alberta Health Services’ facilities and partners. The four types of restraints included in the policy are pharmacologic, mechanical, physical and environmental Click here to read more about “Restraints as a Last Resort” and other important topics in the Appropriate Use of Antipsychotics (AUA) Winter 2016 Bulletin.

How Do You Prepare for Death?

Meet Heather Meyerend, a hospice nurse who works in South Brooklyn. As such, Heather addresses people’s physical, emotional, psychological and spritual needs when they are most vulnerable.

She sees her work as preparing a patient for the voyage he is about to take, and accompanying him partway down the road. She, like most hospice workers, feels that it is a privilege to spend time with the dying, to be allowed into a person’s life and a family’s life when they are at their rawest and most vulnerable, and when they most need help. Some hospice workers believe that working with the dying is the closest you can get on earth to the presence of God.

Click here to continue reading.

Family Presence: More of a Presence

exciting newsFamily Presence is becoming an important topic in Alberta’s healthcare system. As such, we have added a Family Presence area to our website. There you will find some new material that is hot off the press! Click here if you are looking for Family Presence tips, conversation starters and more…

Helping Oneself and Others

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In an online post, Sheila, a member of the Pts4Chg community, raises an important topic. How does one obtain assistance for oneself or others when it comes to health care? How does one

tactfully get help for yourself or a loved one, or even possibly someone we don’t know who is in the hospital and we see that he/she is not getting the care that the Dr. prescribed, such as meds being missed or denied, patient not being fed, etc. Sadly, only those who have a loved one who comes to visit, will get these issues fixed, but I have seen (too many times) meals delivered to people without a loved one there to feed them, which were just picked up and taken away when the dietitians came back to collect trays, no one to feed those who are the most sick and alone or help them get the care the Dr. prescribed. In my local hospital, those with visitors get the most care because then there are ‘witnesses’ to what did or did not happen. The ones who are alone are in a dangerously negligent position.

Any comments and suggestions relating to this topic are welcome.

I have no words. I have a thousand words.

In a recent blog post, Anon456, a former ICU nurse, describes her typical day in the palliative unit. In the midst of paperwork, administration of medicine and providing patient care, Anon456 recognizes what an honor it is to be part of the end-of-life journey.

It’s 0653. I pull up to the hospice unit, clock in, fill my coffee mug, and get my nursing brain printed out. At 0700, I count narcotics and take report on six patients. It’s going to be a busy day, one of those days where I must control the chaos, take the time to support patients, complete as many of the thousand tasks set before me as I can, and be prepared to deal with the unexpected.

I work in a palliative/hospice inpatient unit, a place where patients come when they are in crisis,can’t be cared for at home, or simply have no place else to go. One of my patients today is in indigent man who has no one in the world.We cannot locate his family. We don’t even know his real name. He slipped into a coma yesterday and is non-responsive. We take care of him, call him by the name we think he has, and witness his last hours or days.

Click here to read the full blog post.

‘Unacceptable failures’ in end-of-life care at nights and weekends

According to a recent study, the end-of-life care provided at nights and weekends in the United Kingdom is less than satisfactory. One reason for this is the inadequate number of palliative care specialists available. “There are nowhere near enough palliative care doctors and nurses to provide a 24/7 service across the whole of the UK – we only have 1 palliative care consultant and 5 palliative care nurses per 1000 beds” (http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwxsTMpio).

Is this situation unique to the UK or does it occur elsewhere as well? What is palliative care like where you reside?

Looking for Something to Read?

If you are looking for a new book to read and have an interest in how the humanity of patients and families can be maintained while under hospital care, you may wish to check out Through the Valley of Shadows by Samuel Morris Brown.
Through the valley

Using insights from cognitive psychology, Dr. Samuel Brown discusses new approaches to reduce suffering for patients and their families when they need high levels of care, including concrete strategies to apply before, during, and after a serious illness.

Click here to continue reading.

Continuing Care & Community Living Expo 2016

On Thursday, April 21st, the Continuing Care & Community Living – Expo 2016 was held in Calgary. This event, sponsored by Alberta Health Services and Covenant Heath, focused on introducing individuals and their families to new initiatives, opportunities and technologies relating to independence and aging.

Below are some tweets that @aircalgary sent while attending Expo 2016.

If you were unable to attend the Continuing Care & Community Living – Expo 2016 in Calgary, you have a chance to do so on Friday, May 6th in Edmonton, Alberta. As was the case in Calgary, admission and parking are FREE. To learn more about the event, including the topics that will be addressed, click on the image below.

Expo2016