Out in the Streets

Dr. Jeff Turnbull gets a hug from Shelley, a client, after she gave him a Christmas card, at the Temporary Enhanced Shelter Program at the Shepherds of Good Hope in Ottawa’s Lowertown neighbourhood, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. (Photograph by Justin Tang)


Have you heard of Dr. Jeffrey Turnbull? If not, reading the following will give you a sense of who he is and the important work he is doing.

“At 9:30 a.m. on a bitingly cold early-winter morning, Jeffrey Turnbull is preparing to head out on rounds. From a second-floor window in the ramshackle offices of Ottawa Inner City Health, the Peace Tower is visible in the distance, but Turnbull gestures out over the nearer, nondescript rooftops of Lowertown, describing the long-established homeless shelters there—and the new supervised injection clinic—that he’s about to visit.

A few minutes later, he’s parking his SUV outside the Shepherds of Good Hope, a shelter and soup kitchen, leading a small team that includes a mental health nurse into what they just call “the trailer.” It’s a former construction trailer set up recently behind “the Sheps,” fitted out as a cramped but orderly space where drug addicts can inject themselves with health care workers standing by.

Even on this weekday morning, it’s busy. About 130 addicts used the trailer the previous day. Turnbull has a brief meeting with staff there, then strides next door to a clinic for homeless women…” Click here to read the full article from the Macleans.ca.

Protocol prohibits transplant

Delilah Saunders is critically ill and requires a liver transplant. Unfortunately, she has been deemed ineligible based on a past history of alcohol use. What are your thoughts about this decision and the associated protocol?

Click here to read the story.

What is empathy?


The paramedics who were driving a dying woman to the hospital took a detour, and in so doing fulfilled her final wish.

“Sometimes it is not the drugs/training/skills – sometimes all you need is empathy to make a difference!”

Click here to read this heartwarming story.

Hidden camera finds nursing home staff took hours to give man CPR | Toronto Star

There are some events that leave a person speechless. This is one of them.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2017/11/19/hidden-camera-finds-nursing-home-staff-took-hours-to-give-man-cpr.html

Reminder: Upcoming Events

Friday, November 17 – Change Day
Have you made your Change Day pledge yet? If not, click here to make your pledge?

Thursday, November 30 – Patient Engagement Speaker Series
Helle Tees & Nicole Olivier will be presenting on patient engagement. If you are unable to attend this event in person, you can join the webinar. Click here for more information and to register.

Patient & Family Centred Care Week Begins


Alberta Health Services’ Patient & Family Centred Care Week goes from November 6-10, 2017. A number of events are being held across the province to honour this week. Check out the program to see what is happening over the next five days. Here is hoping you will be able to participate in some of the activities.

A Day in the Life

As part of Patient & Family Centred Care Week, which goes from November 6th-10th, 2017 and Change Day, which occurs on November 17th, 2017, the Calgary Zone of Alberta Health Services has initiated a “Lived Experience” activity. For one day, healthcare professionals will walk in the shoes of a patient as a way of gaining greater insight, understanding, and compassion for what it is their patients live each and every day.

Click on the image below to see what shoes Paul and some other healthcare professionals will be walking in.

Alberta Health Services – An Exciting Initiative

On Thursday, September 28th, Dr. Verna Yiu, Alberta Health Service (AHS) president and CEO, announced that the AHS board had approved a deal that will see the implementation of an advanced clinical information system throughout Alberta. This information system will serve as an information hub for all of AHS’s clinical care areas, which include hospitals, ambulatory clinics and continuing care centres. Currently, there are approximately, 1,300 information systems being used, all of which will be consolidated by this one system. Click here to read more about this initiative and what it will mean to patients, providers and healthcare as a whole.

The Cost of Speaking Up?


Oft times, patients and families are hesitant to express their complaints and concerns relating to a particular care facility. The source of this hesitation can be from a deep sense of fear – the fear of retaliation. While in most cases no negative repercussions result when a complaint or concern is raised, such is not the case in a long-term care facility in Ontario, Canada.

According to a retired hospital nurse and daughter of a resident at the care facility, she is no longer able to stay in her mother’s room while her mother is being cared for by the staff. The reason for this restriction is because of the complaints the daughter made about the substandard care and dangerous hygiene practices she witnessed. “You complain and this is the price you pay.” What does this say about the facility’s view of family presence?

Click here to read the full story.